What Do You Actually Do? Most Creative Entrepreneurs Get This Wrong!

You’ve defined your offerings and how they fit into the simple structure I presented last week – your free, basic, moderate, and premium levels.

Now, let’s market them!!!

Hah. Just kidding. We’ve still got some serious work to do to make sure these offerings are ready for market.

The next step is to define exactly what each of your offerings does for its recipient – your client. What goals do your offerings help your client reach?

When I tackle this question with my clients, they often think this is a straightforward, easy step.

They think, “I offer family portrait photography. The goal I help my clients reach is getting their annual family portrait taken.

But then we dig into this question and more often than not, my clients realize they were only skimming the surface before.

In reality, this same family portrait photographer gives a great deal of attention to the mother during her family session package. This allows the mother, specifically, to…

  • Get their annual family portrait taken
  • Which allows her to display this portrait in her home
  • Which allows her to feel the attention and appreciation from that day every day as she sees the portrait
  • Which allows her to feel more seen and appreciated in her daily life

So in a matter of seconds, we went from…

“I’m a family portrait photographer.”

To, “I help mothers feel more seen and appreciated every single day.”

See how powerful this exercise can be?

What Do You Actually Do? Most Creative Entrepreneurs Get This Wrong, online marketing strategy for creative female entrepreneurs

Now, let’s work on YOUR offerings so YOU can know what your offerings truly provide:

Step 1 – List your offerings across the top of a blank page or spreadsheet (OR grab this worksheet I’ve already created for you).

Step 2 – Write the main, surface-level result each of your offerings provides. (i.e. With our family portrait photographer, this was “Get their family portrait taken”)

Step 3 – For each offering, ask yourself, “If that’s the main result, what does that then do for my client?” (i.e. With our family portrait photographer, this was “Which allows her to display this portrait in her home.”

Step 4 – Continue asking, “What does that then do for my client?” until you’ve reached the heart of the matter. You may ask this question a few times. You may ask it twenty times. Continue asking until you’ve found something truly meaningful to you and your client. (i.e. With our family portrait photographer, this was “Which allows her to feel more seen and appreciated in her daily life.”)

Once you’ve drilled into exactly what your offerings provide, you’ll be able to speak about them in a more meaningful way.

My clients often use the results from this exercise in their business taglines, social media bios, personal bios, and website copy.

Not to mention, when they’re asked the infamous question, “So what do you do?” they’ve got a memorable, meaningful answer to give.

So, now I have to ask… What do you do?

Author: Brit Kolo