What If I Focus On My Ideal Client and Miss Out On Everyone Else?

Before we head into the next few weeks defining your ideal client, we have to get something straight.

Defining your ideal client does challenge you to get focused on one, specific idea of a person – someone truly ideal for your business.

Getting focused on this one ideal is a beneficial, crucial exercise if you want to increase the number of life-giving clients on your client list and decrease the number of soul-suckers. That’s how it works.

However, getting focused on this one ideal also brings up a common fear within my coaching clients and I’d bet it has run across your mind too.

That fearful thought sounds like, “But if I focus on one ideal, I’ll miss out on getting clients willing to pay me RIGHT NOW.”

I’ll admit, this fear is a tough one to coach clients through because it stems from a financial root. And unless your business is already thriving and you don’t “need” the money, the thought of turning less-than-ideal clients away from your business is downright terrifying.

After all, you started this business to work with clients you could serve and to make a certain amount of money. Whether that money pays for your car loan, your kid’s daycare, or your entire life, that money does matter. Without it, what the heck are you in business for?

So as you begin to niche your business, deciding to work with just this one type of person, you notice there are so many others out there NOT categorized as this one type of person that you could technically still serve. It’s not an ideal situation. These clients aren’t necessarily easy to work with. But they’ll pay you.

And there you have it. The number one reason creative entrepreneurs continue to settle for less than ideal and find themselves stuck.

So again I’m here to tell you – ideal clients matter. And if we can get focused on one, your business can thrive.

But we’ve still got to get past this fear of letting less-than-ideal clients pass us by.

What If I Focus On My Ideal Client and Miss Out On Everyone Else?, online marketing strategy for creative female entrepreneurs

Here’s how we get through this fear in order to grow our businesses in a meaningful way:

Because that is what we’re after, right? Meaningful growth. Working with clients that don’t suck the life from us. Having days and weeks and months and year that we genuinely enjoy.

Yes. Okay. Let’s begin.

First, YES, you may have to give up going after the low-hanging fruit of less-than-ideal clients willing to give you a buck right now.

But I challenge you to consider how much that quick money COSTS you.

Working with a client that’s not uniquely suited for you gives everyone a sub-par experience. You not only feel crappy about giving a sub-par experience, but your client is also going to be less apt to refer ideal clients to you.

See? You might get money now, but you won’t get money later.

Also consider how much time you spend with this less-than-ideal client. This is time you could be using to attract and earn better clients.

Yes, it’s potentially a short-term loss. But for a LONG-TERM GAIN.

Because the sooner you begin working with more ideal clients, the sooner your reputation changes.

The sooner more and more people know you for working incredible well with this one type of person.

The sooner that one type of person can’t imagine working with anyone else but you.

The sooner you’re in high demand and can charge a higher rate.

The sooner you’re not desperate for any client, but confident in your ability to get the best clients.

Have I convinced you yet that this fear of focusing on an ideal client is holding you back?

I hope so. Because it’s time to move past it.

On Thursday, I’ll be publishing the first of two blog posts that will instruct you on how to define your ideal client and their mental cravings.

You cannot go into those two exercises being fearful of what it might mean to your short-term bottom line. You have to complete these two exercises with the goal of improving your long-term bottom line, but also your entire business.

You in?

Good. See you Thursday.

Author: Brit Kolo

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