How NOT to Sound Desperate When Writing a Facebook Post

Writing a Facebook post for your business ain’t for the faint of heart. (Bad English. Good point.)

When you’re writing a Facebook post, you’re writing sales copy – words put together in a specific way with the goal of enticing its reader to DO something that will benefit your business.

You’re selling something. Period.

Ew, sales. Slimy selling. (That’s what so many of you just felt in the pit of your stomach.)

It’s no secret that “SALES” is a dirty word, drumming up that little (eh, big) icky feeling within. Selling something, whether it’s a product or service, can be intimidating. This is especially true in person. Stand in front of a human being and try to get them to hand you money? Cue the Halloween music and heeby-jeebies.

I’d argue that writing a Facebook post for your business is the exact same thing. The difference is that now your sales tactics are IN WRITING.

Could this get any more frightening?

But here’s the thing – just like when you’re standing in front of someone trying to sell something, if you’re scared of being pushy or sounding desperate for the sale, chances are that you WILL sound pushy or desperate and NOT make the sale.

Any “born salesman” will tell you that sales is in the CONFIDENCE you bring to the table. No one wants to do business with someone that…

  1. Doesn’t feel confident in WHAT they’re selling,

  2. Doesn’t feel confident in THEMSELVES, and/or

  3. Seems desperate to make the sale (aka PUSHY.. ew).

When you’re writing a fun post and just showing off something exciting in your business, this dynamic doesn’t often come into play. But when you’re using Facebook strategically to get the word out about a new service or product and you honestly NEED to make some sales, sounding desperate will only push people away.

No one wants to do business with desperate. Point blank.No one wants to do business with desperate. JAM Marketing Group

This challenge came up recently with a friend of mine. His company had the opportunity to be voted to receive a local award. If his company were to win said award, it would receive a decent amount of free press (cash THAT in). To win the award, though, he’d need people to vote for his business.

The obvious place to turn was to Facebook. He had a strong following and plenty of engagement on most of his posts, so people were tuned in to his Page. If he were to post something that asked people to vote for his business, many of his followers would see it.

But wouldn’t that come off as desperate? Asking for votes? It definitely could come off the wrong way if done poorly, but it doesn’t have to.

Here’s what we did with the original “desperate” version to make it a winning post:

Post 1.0: “We’re in the running to win [Special] Award! We need your votes!!! Go to [URL] to vote for us!”

Post 2.o: “Voting now open for the [Special] Award. If we’re your favorite [business] we would appreciate your vote. Go to [URL] to cast yours.”

Post 3.0: “Voting is now open for the [Special] Award. If we’re your favorite [business], we would appreciate your vote. Go to [URL] to cast yours. If we’re not your favorite, what can we do better? Please send us a message with your feedback. We are nothing without our customers and our community. Thank you for your loyalty, love, and support!”

We went from desperate to decent to down-right respectable.

Here’s how we did it:

  1. We imagined we were talking to someone face-to-face. A REAL LIFE CUSTOMER. We figured out what we would say to them if they were right there in front of us.
  2. We calmed down and took out the exclamation points that made it sound like we were screaming at our customer. Again, even if you ARE, indeed, desperate, your copy should NOT come off that way.
  3. We asked humbly for what we were seeking.
  4. We made it a conversation, asking for feedback.
  5. We thanked our viewers.

The next time you have to sit down to write a Facebook post while 647 things are going on and you KNOW you need to sell your thing or get votes or get likes or whatever, slow down and act as if your customer is standing right there in your office.

You’ll represent yourself respectfully, humbly, and not just get the sale, but EARN the sale.

Author: Brit Kolo